How Your Personality Style Impacts Conflict
November 18, 2020

A team that trusts each other implicitly, with vulnerability-based trust will engage in robust conflict.

When they engage in robust conflict that’s not destructive, they’ll make strong commitments to one another. Because they make strong commitments to one another, they’ll hold each other accountable.

Lastly, when they do all four of those behaviors, the team gets great results. Not “I centered results,” but team results.

However, your DISC personality style can impact these healthy and event unhealthy conflict behaviors.

Here is what I mean:

A “D” in healthy conflict addresses issues head-on. They speak up about problems and are very frank and direct about them. However, when the D style becomes unhealthy in conflict, they will start to overpower, and get aggressive with their words, and their tone, and they may say things that you might regret.

An “I” in good conflict expresses their feeling openly. They’re not afraid to talk about the conflict, and they will show empathy towards other people. However, when it gets unhealthy, they’ll become overly dramatic, maybe talk a lot, with a lot of emotion, and they may begin to dwell on wounded relationships.

An “S” in good conflict encourages calmness, and they tend to listen to other people’s perspectives. However, when it gets unhealthy, they don’t speak up about their own needs, and they will cave in to avoid tension and to avoid anything that looks like an unhealthy conflict.

And lastly, a “C” in good conflict will stick up for their rights; they’ll focus on logic and objectivity, the details. However, in an unhealthy conflict, they will become passive-aggressive. They may try to overpower everybody, with details, and logic, and facts, and they will also avoid emotional situations and retreat.

If you’d like to do a deeper dive on how to develop your team through trust, email: len@theleadershipquest.com

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November 18, 2020         How Your Personality Style Impacts Conflict

A team that trusts each other implicitly, with vulnerability-based trust will engage in robust conflict.

When they engage in robust conflict that’s not destructive, they’ll make strong commitments to one another. Because they make strong commitments to one another, they’ll hold each other accountable.

Lastly, when they do all four of those behaviors, the team gets great results. Not “I centered results,” but team results.

However, your DISC personality style can impact these healthy and event unhealthy conflict behaviors.

Here is what I mean:

A “D” in healthy conflict addresses issues head-on. They speak up about problems and are very frank and direct about them. However, when the D style becomes unhealthy in conflict, they will start to overpower, and get aggressive with their words, and their tone, and they may say things that you might regret.

An “I” in good conflict expresses their feeling openly. They’re not afraid to talk about the conflict, and they will show empathy towards other people. However, when it gets unhealthy, they’ll become overly dramatic, maybe talk a lot, with a lot of emotion, and they may begin to dwell on wounded relationships.

An “S” in good conflict encourages calmness, and they tend to listen to other people’s perspectives. However, when it gets unhealthy, they don’t speak up about their own needs, and they will cave in to avoid tension and to avoid anything that looks like an unhealthy conflict.

And lastly, a “C” in good conflict will stick up for their rights; they’ll focus on logic and objectivity, the details. However, in an unhealthy conflict, they will become passive-aggressive. They may try to overpower everybody, with details, and logic, and facts, and they will also avoid emotional situations and retreat.

If you’d like to do a deeper dive on how to develop your team through trust, email: len@theleadershipquest.com